Remain in Christ the Anchor

Remain in Christ,for He is the anchor for your souls when the storms of life hit.

2015 is here! I love turning to a new calendar page, using fresh notebooks with no markings, and looking ahead to limitless possibilities in the coming months. But the minute that someone suggests I make a New Year’s resolution, I start to feel adrift. I become increasingly aware of all the things I am barely getting done as it is. Thinking of grabbing hold of another goal makes me feel like I’ll get pulled under and never be able to come up for air.

Those of you impressive people who have resolved to swear off plastic grocery bags forever, or who are going to run a half marathon, or are going to lose a bunch of weight — I applaud and admire you. I invite you to come over and organize my closets. We could have a great time chatting and I promise to make you a lovely cup of tea. But I can’t join you in pursuing your new year’s resolutions because just thinking about it is making me feel stressed out and inadequate.

As I write this, I’m looking out at Megunticook River in Camden, Maine. The river is currently covered by a sheet of ice but during the summer our dock is surrounded by kayaks. My parents gave our older kids kayaks for their birthdays a few years ago, and pretty much every day of the summer my dad reminded them to tie up their kayaks to the dock. “One of these days, you’re going to wake up in the morning and your kayaks will be gone,” he’d warn. But tying up a kayak takes forever, so more often than not, the kayaks were just dragged onto the dock and turned upside down.

One night, a storm hit Camden as we slept. Sure enough, when we woke in the morning, one of the kayaks was missing. My dad didn’t need to say a word; everyone knew that the kayak should have been tied up, and that an expensive gift had possibly been lost. The kids searched for it for days, and when it was finally found, it was dirty and banged up and hard to pull out of the weeds.

The kids didn’t enjoy taking time to search for the kayak, but probably the hardest thing for them was the knowledge that they’d disappointed their grandfather. He’d sacrificed to give them such a generous gift, and they hadn’t valued it enough to take care of it. The untethered kayak makes me think about my spiritual life. God’s given me the incredible gift of a close relationship with Him, and He promises to guide me and strengthen me through every moment of my life. It cost Him everything to offer me that gift. How does He ask me to take care of it? The answer is found in John 15:5, “I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.” Remain in Christ, being as grafted to Him as a branch is to the vine, like tightly tying the kayak’s rope to the dock.

To remain in Christ takes time. And we are so busy. It’s just so much quicker to take the easy way out. All too often, we settle for pulling the kayak up on the dock instead of tethering ourselves to God.

We talk about God, instead of talking to Him. We get our bodies to church, but keep our hearts somewhere else. We sit down to read the Bible, but end up reading about someone else’s experience of God instead. We run on fumes from time spent with God a long time ago, hoping that it’ll be enough to fill us and keep us going today.

All those things can look good from the outside. When the day runs smoothly, we’ll probably feel that it’s good enough. A good enough relationship with God. A good enough spiritual life. The kayak will stay on the dock and be there in the morning.

‘John 15:5, “I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.” Remain in Christ, being as grafted to Him as a branch is to the vine.’

Unless the storm hits. And it will. It can be in the form of an unwelcome phone call in the middle of the night. It can come in the words of one who promised to be faithful but no longer wants to keep that vow. It can come when the accumulation of disappointment or loneliness or uncertainty just gets to be too much. It can come when kids are whiny or hopes are shattered or unkind words pierce the heart. It’s at those times that we need an anchor for the soul.

Christ is our hope, and He is the anchor for our souls.

The daily disciples of prayer, Bible reading, receiving the sacraments…these are the ropes that connect us to the anchor. His presence and His promises never fail. He is steadfast. Our part is to remain in Him. Remaining in Him every once in a while won’t bring the change and the peace that we long for. But if we resolve to remain in Christ every day, there will be no limit to the transformation and soul rest that we can experience.

My one resolution for 2015? Remain in Christ, tethered–every day–to the Anchor of my soul.

Lisa